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Why, in the world's most affluent nation, are so many corporations squeezing their employees dry? In this fresh, carefully researched book, reporter Steven Greenhouse explores the economic, political, and social trends that are transforming America's workplaces, including the decline of the social contract that created the world's largest

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Why, in the world's most affluent nation, are so many corporations squeezing their employees dry? In this fresh, carefully researched book, New York Times reporter Steven Greenhouse explores the economic, political, and social trends that are transforming America's workplaces, including the decline of the social contract that created the world's largest middle class and guaranteed job security and good pensions. We meet all kinds of workers-white-collar and blue-collar, high-tech and low-tech, middle-class and low-income-as we see shocking examples of injustice, including employees who are locked in during a hurricane of fired after suffering debilitating, on-the-job injuries.

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Not all employers do these things, of course. Many employers value their employees, cultivate their skills and their loyalty, and reward them fairly. (Those employers are not usually the subject of organizing drives.) But other employers, especially in recent years, have been ratcheting up demands, and wringing more out of fewer workers, in what some scholars call the “Gloves-Off Economy,” and what Steve Greenhouse calls “The Big Squeeze,” in two other recent books on the deteriorating state of work life in America. These practices have taken a big toll not only on workers’ wages and working conditions but on their legal rights and labor standards.

Steven Greenhouse is the labor and workplace reporter for The New York Times, having held that beat since October 1995.
A new book by the labor reporter Steven Greenhouse examines how much of the American workforce is working more but earning less. Wages have stagnated, health and pension benefits have grown stingier, and job security has shriveled. The book is titled .Steven Greenhouse:We all love Barbara Ehrenreich's book , and I felt, I'm going to try building on that. And I really try looking across the board what's happening to the nation's workers. I look at, you know, farm workers. I look at Microsoft workers. I look at, you know, factory workers, whose jobs are disappearing to Mexico. And I look at, you know, software engineers at Hewlett-Packard, at some other places, you know, that have lost their jobs to India. I look at janitors in Houston who -- I focus on one janitor in Houston, who, after ten years, is making just $5.25 an hour. I write about a Dominican worker in Brooklyn who works eleven hours a day for just $35 a day. You know, the whole panoply of what's happening, to show that there's this big squeeze on the nation's workers, where, as you were just saying, wages have been flat, health and pension benefits are getting worse, at the same time corporate profits have gone up very, very nicely. Employee productivity has gone up 15, 20 percent, yet wages have been flat, plus companies are pressuring workers, you know, to work harder and harder.
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With the national convention of the AFL-CIO set to begin next week, the country's largest labor federation has developed a plan to expand significantly the country's labor movement. Steve Greenhouse's article in the New York Times provides a preview of the strategy.

Steven Greenhouse is the labor and workplace reporter for The New York Times, having held that beat since October 1995.

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I think it’s only pessimistic to say, oh, there’s going to be very little coverage of labor and workplaces issues now that Steve Greenhouse is leaving the Times. There are a lot of very good young reporters writing about workplace matters … just to name a few: Lydia DePillis of the Washington Post, Josh Eidelson at Businessweek, Dave Jamieson at Huffington Post, Alejandra Cancino at the Chicago Tribune.

Steven Greenhouse is the labor and workplace reporter for The New York Times, having held that beat since October 1995.

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A workshop on quality improvement approaches was conducted by Barbara Conrad, Quality Care Training Program Coordinator of the SEIU Healthcare PA Training and Education Fund. Stu Winby (right), President of Sapience, conducted a third workshop focused on innovation and rapid cycle process improvement. Steve Greenhouse, the labor reporter for the New York Times, shared his views on the current state of unions in this country and suggested that they need to be both innovative and connected more to patients and the communities if they are to survive.