"Yes, they be," assented Old Woman Magoun, with open contempt.

Old Woman Magoun was largely instrumental in bringing the bridge to pass. She haunted the miserable little grocery, wherein whiskey and hands of tobacco were the most salient features of the stock in trade, and she talked much. She would elbow herself into the midst of a knot of idlers and talk.

Sample topic, essay writing: Old Woman Magoun - 682 words

Research  and essay writing, free essay topics, sample works Old Woman Magoun

"Yes, they be," assented Old Woman Magoun, with opencontempt.

"It seems queer to me," Old Woman Magoun said to Sally Jinks,"that men can't do nothin' without havin' to drink and chew to keeptheir sperits up. Lord! I've worked all my life and never donenuther."

, "A White Heron"; , "Old Woman Magoun"; , Contending Forces

Old Woman Magoun and some other women planned a treat—twosucking pigs, and pies, and sweet cake—for a reward after thebridge should be finished. They even viewed leniently the increasedconsumption of ardent spirits.

Reaction Paper: “Old Woman Magoun”
Old Woman Magoun and some other women planned a treat–two sucking pigs, and pies, and sweet cake–for a reward after the bridge should be finished. They even viewed leniently the increased consumption of ardent spirits.Mary E. Wilkins Freeman's short story "Old Woman Magoun" was originally published in Harper's New Monthly magazine in October 1905. This tragic story was next included in a collection of Freeman's short stories published in 1909, called The Winning Lady and Others. Most recently, "Old Woman Magoun" was anthologized in The Oxford Book of American Short Stories (1992).The two women sat on a bench in front of Old Woman Magoun’s house, and little Lily Barry, her granddaughter, sat holding her doll on a small mossy stone near by. From where they sat they could see the men at work on the new bridge. It was the last day of the work.Old Woman Magoun was largely instrumental in bringing the bridge to pass. She haunted the miserable little grocery, wherein whiskey and hands of tobacco were the most salient features of the stock in trade, and she talked much. She would elbow herself into the midst of a knot of idlers and talk.Freeman's short stories often depict the lives and conflicts of New England women. Her work might best be described as that of a realist and a regionalist, since her stories deal honestly with poverty, marriage, and loneliness among the women and families who inhabit New England. Freeman's female characters display strength in dealing with conflict, often in the face of patriarchal oppression. "Old Woman Magoun" fits well into this literary tradition of women who struggle against societal conventions. The story's heroine, Mrs. Magoun, is an older woman who so completely desires to protect her granddaughter, Lily, that she is willing to kill the child to save her. The conflict that this woman faces is typical of Freeman's female characters, who show great strength when forced to find a means of survival in a man's world.The two women sat on a bench in front of Old Woman Magoun s house, and little Lily Barry, her granddaughter, sat holding her doll on a small mossy stone near by. From where they sat they could see the men at work on the new bridge. It was the last day of the work.
Questions on Mary E. Wilkins Freeman’s “Old Woman Magoun,” “The Revolt of ‘Mother,’” and “The Long Arm”

Old Woman Magoun - Wilkins Freeman

Old Woman Magoun was largely instrumental in bringing the bridgeto pass. She haunted the miserable little grocery, wherein whiskeyand hands of tobacco were the most salient features of the stock intrade, and she talked much. She would elbow herself into the midstof a knot of idlers and talk.

III. “Old Woman Magoun”

Old Woman Magoun - Questia Online Library

Old Woman Magoun looked after him majestically. "You can cuss all you want to. Nelson Barry," said she; "I ain't afraid of you. I don't expect you to lay ary log of the bridge, but I'm goin' to have it built this very summer." She did. The weakness of the masculine element in Barry's Ford was laid low before such strenuous feminine assertion.

III. “Old Woman Magoun”

Old Woman Magoun - Civic Reflection

The major themes of Freeman's work illuminate aspects of her life. Mary Wilkins Freeman's words to describe the feeling of receiving her first acceptance and check for a short story provide an interesting context: "I felt my wings spring from my shoulders, capable of flight, and I flew home" (New York Times, April 1926). Her statement characterizes the dilemma this remarkable turn-of-the-century New England writer faced, the paradox that she expressed in almost all of her work. Feeling "capable of flight" because of the power of her capacity as a writer, Freeman nevertheless could only fly "home." Most striking in her life and work is the haunting echo of two inner voices: a voice that cries out for rebellious flight, another voice that clings to the safety of home. The heroines of Freeman's short stories, even as they rebel, struggle with this conflict. Students may compare the heroines of "A Church Mouse," "The Revolt of 'Mother,' "and "Old Woman Magoun," listening for the ways in which Freeman invests the women with power and yet simultaneously limits their power, bringing their rebellious "flights" to what Freeman considered "home"--the realities of nineteenth-century New England.