James Stacey Taylor, editor The College of New Jersey

David Benatar is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Cape Town.
Ben Bradley is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Syracuse University.
Kai Draper is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Delaware.
Walter Glannon is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Calgary.
John Harris is the Lord Alliance Professor of Bioethics and Director of the Institute for Science, Ethics, and Innovation at the University of Manchester.
Barbara Baum Levenbook is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at North Carolina State University.
Steven Luper is Professor of Philosophy atTrinity University.
Kris McDaniel is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Syracuse University.
Martha Nussbaum is the Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics at the Law School at the University of Chicago.
Stephen E. Rosenbaum is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Nevada-Law Vegas.
Geoffrey Scarre is Professor of Philosophy at Durham University and the Co-Director of Durham University Centre for the Ethics of Cultural Heritage.
Harry S. Silverstein is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Philosophy at Washington State University.
James Stacey Taylor is an Associate Professor of Philosophyat The College of New Jersey.
James Warren is a Reader in Ancient Philosophy and a Fellow and Director of Studies in Philosophy at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge University.
Palle Yourgrau is the Harry A. Wolfson Professor of Philosophy at Brandeis University.

Learn Liberty | James Stacey Taylor

James Stacey Taylor, Ph.D., is an associate professor of philosophy at The College of New Jersey.

James Stacey Taylor | Barnes & Noble

James Stacey Taylor is an associate professor of philosophy at The College of New Jersey. He focusses much of his work around the issue of autonomy.

Works by James Stacey Taylor - PhilPapers

James Stacey Taylor is an associate professor of philosophy at The College of New Jersey. He focusses much of his work around the issue of autonomy.

By James Stacey Taylor
James Stacey Taylor is currently an associate professor at The College of New Jersey

James Stacey Taylor: Don't base public policy on public opinion polls

James Stacey Taylor is a philosophy professor at the College of New Jersey and has authored several articles on the ethics of organ transplantation. He spoke yesterday with Star-Ledger editorial writer Jim Namiotka. This is an edited version of their conversation.

The Metaphysics and Ethics of Death New Essays Edited by James Stacey Taylor

James Stacey Taylor argues for the | CourseMerit

This is the first volume in which an account of personal autonomy is developed that both captures the contours of this concept as it is used in social philosophy and bioethics, and is theoretically grounded in, and a part of, contemporary autonomy theory. James Stacey Taylor's account is unique as it is explicitly a political one, recognizing that the attribution of autonomy to agents is dependent in part on their relationships with others and not merely upon their own mental states. The volume is distinctive in its examples, which touch on the ethics of using inducements to encourage persons to participate in medical research, the ethical issues associated with the use of antibiotics, and the ethical basis for both patient confidentiality and informed consent.

James Stacey Taylor recent years surveillance technology has undergone a revolution.

James Stacey Taylor, Associate Professor

This essay will argue the point on why we should learn to stop worrying and love (some) government surveillance. James Stacey Taylor’s idea about government surveillance monitoring each state will blow you away or open your eyes. I will draw attention to some good points, bad points, and my beliefs and why I think this way about his view. By the end of this essay I hope to have answered your entire question on this topic of interest. Which is government surveillance could be a positive or negative problem for people? The first inquiry to be address is how Dyson explained his pessimistic doubts that technological innovations frequently serve to increase social oppression and inequality. I will answer this in a two part answers, in which I will tell you how Dyson look at technology was used and who benefited from the changes. Dyson started addressing his pessimistic doubts with examples from history and his own life. He talked about how technology started out in the fourteenth century with printing becoming the first technology transformation in Europe. With this new invention, people all through Europe had the able to have books to read and educate themselves as well as their fellow countrymen by educating themselves. The technology of printing gave power to the reproduction of the Bible which led directly to the Protestant Reformation in Northern Europe. By using the technology the Protestant ethic carried it with perpetual striving for social justice a vision that was seldom achieved. The next things Dyson begin pointing out was the sensibleness of technology which led the way for social justice during the next two centuries. Dyson talked about how public services such as clean water, sewage treatment, antibiotics and vaccines helped with bring the gap between rich and poor closer. The reason for this as he pointed out was these technologies were...