Everyone is fighting for equal rights and justice

Malcolm x was born inOmaha, Nebraska, on May 19, 1925,and spent much of his life fighting for equal rights for AfricanAmericans. Freedom for African Americans was supposed to have come withthe end of the Civil War in 1865,but their struggle to attain equality persisted well into the nextcentury, and continues today. Despite freed slaves’ legal and politicalgains during the period just after the Civil War, known as Reconstruction, theyand their children suffered blows to their rights in the last decadesof the nineteenth century. For example, in the case of theU.S. Supreme Court ruled that segregation, in the form of “separatebut equal” public facilities, was constitutional. Legalized racismacross America, especially in the South, continued through the firsthalf of the twentieth century.

Palestinians are fighting for equal rights and justice

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Fighting for Equal Rights - Essay - 829 Words - StudyMode

When you think of the civil rights movement in the United States, that conjures up images of members of stigmatized groups fighting for equal rights: from African-Americans in the 1950s to women in the 1970s to gays and lesbians today. They sought legal rights equal to those of entrenched and powerful groups: whites, males, heterosexuals.

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While women have been fighting for equal rights for longer than we can imagine, the fight for the ERA got its start in 1848 at the first Women’s Rights Convention in Seneca Falls. The women’s movement has made amazing strides towards equality such as getting the right to vote, passing Title IX for equality in schools, and leading the fight against sexual violence and sexism. However, even today inequality continues to be an obstacle for women everywhere. The ERA would do much to eradicate those continuing obstacles of equality.

Fighting for equal rights.
This picture is of women fighting for their Equal Rights Amendment. Alice Paul is one of the women that lead this movement. They believed if you are a man or a woman Equal Rights should not be denied. Gender should not prevent a person from gaining equal protection. People who were against the ERA grew fear that it would now put women in combat, terminate laws that protected homemakers and same-sex marriages would grow. The ERA won 35 states approval in 1977 and began a new lifestyle for their role as a woman. Now woman were given lifetime jobs, education, and even a role in political field. (Equal Rights Amendment).When you think of the civil rights movement in the United States, that conjures up images of members of stigmatized groups fighting for equal rights: from African-Americans in the 1950s to women in the 1970s to gays and lesbians today. They sought legal rights equal to those of entrenched and powerful groups: whites, males, heterosexuals.
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Fight for Equal Rights | Women's Page History

Led by our President Neil Weare, an accomplished civil rights attorney and graduate of Yale Law School, we are fighting for equal rights and representation through groundbreaking legal action. Courts can offer a more level playing field than Congress for those who are marginalized by political inequality.

A member of the ERA Coalition explains why she is still fighting for the Equal Rights Amendment

How long have women been fighting for equal rights - Answers

In theory fighting for equal rights no matter a person's personal background will involve righting against stereotypes and social stigma in terms of gender, religious affiliation, ethnicity, sexuality, able-bodiedness, types of relationships, types of families, etc etc etc. The list can go on and on and on. I am probably missing something because there are so many factors and issues that strongly effect people and are unequal depending on where and when a person lives.

South Korea's LGBT Community Is Fighting for Equal Rights

Fighting for equal rights : a story about Susan B

By Martin Luther King III, contributor to

It was perhaps not fully known that day in 1963, on the crowded steps of the Lincoln Memorial, that my father’s audacious dream would reshape the contours of justice and equality in America.

I’m proud of my father, but my pride cannot be fully measured by that snapshot in history. Because contrary to first glance, my father’s legacy comes not from his presiding over the final act in the drama of fighting for equal rights — his legacy is about setting the stage.

Because he knew then the enduring challenge we would still face today: So long as America is an economically and socially divided nation, the project of equality is a project unfinished.

My father, the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., devoted his life to achieving civil equality in our democracy, but that was only the beginning. The poor and disenfranchised – too often those in communities of color – still disproportionately bear society’s harms through no fault of their own. That truth has compelled the fight for social justice across the spectrum: labor rights, women’s rights –and yes – environmental rights.



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